PR(Photo By Band Camp)

“AHE” (previous review)

“Price Of Success” (previous review)

“Rolling Stoned” (previous review)

After much anticipation and campaigning, Selah, the first collaboration project from Southern Audible Hustle Entertainment artists Rod McCoy and Synik finally hit the net this past weekend. It has been receiving some pretty positive feedback thus far, so of course The Illixer had to get in on the action. It contains a total of 17 tracks. Three of which have been previously reviewed on the site (see above). There is also a nice diverse collective of producers and guest appearances on deck as well. Dive into this journey fueled by ‘malt liquor and good dope’ after the break.
“New South”
This is the first full length record on the LP. It was produced by 5 Star Beatz. And that name couldn’t be any more accurate. The production is blazing. The sunken foundation, streetwise supporting details, hypnotic rhythm, and businesslike vibe make for an unforgettable combination. The hook is sick too. The delivery is captivating and the lyrics are extremely fetching. Lines like: “The South is risen. For years you just heard the beats. I’mma make you pay attention to what we penning. It would behoove you to take a listen. It’s more to us than shiny rims and talking pimping;” leave quite the impression on the ears. The verses are exceptional. The fellas incorporate serious flows, inventive wordplay, and high grade rhymes. They do an excellent job of portraying legitimate Southern talents. A sprinkling of noteworthy lines include: “They see that ‘Bama’ on my f–king body. They be like nah he don’t spit it like a f–king shotty. I’m ’bout it ’bout it if you wanna make some real s–t. I got my partner partner Synik. What the deal is? Mississippi, Alabama well represented. Running tracks, breaking records on the wall. Put a nail in it. Hall of fame flow.” Rod McCoy came correct with those bars right there. Overall, this song is a banger as well as the site favorite.
“Million Dollar $cheme”
The production here is enjoyable. It was done by Johnny Juliano. The light-footed base, finespun background ingredients, vivacious tempo, and nonchalant vibe result in a favorable mixture. The hook is fitting. The delivery is clean and the lyrics are pertinent. The verses are satisfactory. Synik steps up first and Rod McCoy respectably follows suite. Each artist carries out a precise flow, conventional wordplay, and practical rhymes. They speak on the familiar scenario of balancing living out a dream with real life financial responsibilities. A handful of citable lines from Synik are: “Defying stereotypes with every syllable. My fresh compound is a mix of many chemicals. I hear ’em talking. He don’t sound Southern to me. He got a serial killer flow. Look how he smother the beat. (…) So yes I’m discernibly different. Still lyrically gifted. World traveled or switching pivots. When they ask where I’m from, it’s Meridian comma Mississippi. Not the coldest yet but gotta admit I’m kind of chilly.” One has to appreciate the slyness within those bars. All in all, this is a gratifying offering.
“Parkin’ Lot Pimpin”
Jay B serves as the producer this time around. The production here is very laid-back. It is made up of: a cavalier infrastructure, nuanced atypical musical elements, a leisurely pace, and a plush vibe. The hook is alluring. The delivery is stylish and the lyrics are easily retained. The verses are telling. The duo lace the track with sleek flows, enticing wordplay, and debonair rhymes. They take the listener through a night out on the town. There’s a little smoking involved as well as some fun with the ladies. But nothing too serious because the fellas like to keep it moving. An excerpt from their extracurriculars include: “Pull up to the club real slow, music blasting. Window half down. You can’t see behind this black tint. Black chick, a** thick. I’m stuck like traffic. Said baby could you hold up like Ashton. Roll to the left. A n—a had to park the whip. It’s just me and the Synik. Smoking Peter Parker’s b—h. I’m just trying to see what’s up. I ain’t trying to lock ya b—h. (…) I just gotta let you know what it is off the rip. Ain’t trying to fall in love. I’m telling you now so you don’t trip.” Nothing but pure finesse being emitted from those words by Mr. McCoy. In the end, this is a breezy high quality selection.
**My Two Cents: Selah is a great well rounded album. Synik and Rod McCoy provide a versatile image of Southern Hip-Hop. From hood anthems to recreational joints to tunes that evoke thought, they bring it all. It is not only a reflection of just how flexible they are as artists but it also serves their purpose in proving that our friends from the bottom of the map have more to offer than what the mainstream world portrays. Of course any REAL Hip-Hop head already knew that. I liked this project a lot and I think readers will too. The mass appeal and professional grade craftsmanship makes it one of my favorite projects to be released this year. So stop procrastinating and go check it out on Band Camp pronto. -MinM